chronos insights blog: San Francisco vs New York (2 of 2)

getchronos:

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One’s the backdrop of Mrs. Doubtfire and The Rock, the other’s the setting of Ghostbusters and Holden Caulfield’s escapades. The land of sourdough bread and perpetually needing a sweatshirt vs. the concrete jungle where dreams are made of (that line always felt like it had one preposition…

Song of the weekend.

Source: Spotify

The Shins  (Taken with Instagram at Shoreline Amphitheatre)

The Shins (Taken with Instagram at Shoreline Amphitheatre)

Dueling photogs.  (Taken with Instagram)

Dueling photogs. (Taken with Instagram)

#FreePussyRiot protest sign, on a Soviet era fixie. #onlyinSF (Taken with Instagram)

#FreePussyRiot protest sign, on a Soviet era fixie. #onlyinSF (Taken with Instagram)

#stayhungry

Source: Spotify

Rexly: The Shape of Things To Come

rexly:

We are ridiculously excited and deeply humbled to announce that Rexly has been acquired by Live Nation Labs, an innovation group inside Live Nation Entertainment that is building a portfolio of digital products from scratch and overhauling the Fortune 500 company’s brand. Team Rexly will open a…

Spiral hot dog, cc: @loh (Taken with Instagram)

Spiral hot dog, cc: @loh (Taken with Instagram)

Giant robot snake.  (Taken with Instagram at Google I/O 2012)

Giant robot snake. (Taken with Instagram at Google I/O 2012)

Scrapping the Vanity Metrics of Running

I’ve never been able to get into running. I hit the treadmill now and then, and spend most of the time looking at my speed and time. I tried covering console with a towel. I tried counting in my head to pass the time. But time only moved slower. It’s just boring.

I now believe the failed attempts at creating habits were not grounded in boredom, but from vanity metrics that were boring to keep track of. New year’s resolutions were of X miles Y times a week. It was always about the numbers, not why I was running, and routines never stuck.

While I’m late to the party in blogging about Born To Run, I won’t make the case now for barefoot running. What struck me about the accounts of the Tarahumara’s superhuman feats was the sheer joy they derived from running, not the numbers of miles they ran.

While I don’t ever expect to run a supermarathon with a smile on my face, I now aim to focus on why I run in the first place: To feel good and stay in shape. What are the metrics for this? Feeling good and keeping habit of running regularly. Not X miles Y times a week.

So I have a new routine: Run outside every morning that I don’t have an early meeting. I don’t carry a watch or calculate distances on Google maps. I run as far as I can, and pay attention to what my body tells me—monitoring my cardio, tracking aches and pains, etc.

The results: I actually enjoy running. Without time or distance dictating where I go, I explore streets I’ve never been down and enjoy my surroundings. For the fist time, I’m able run on concrete without getting terrible shin splints, because I adjust pace as my body demands.

Most importantly, the habit of running is finally sticking.